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Best Self-Tanners for Asian Skin Tones | Benefits & Drawbacks

Best Self-Tanners for Asian Skin Tones | Benefits & Drawbacks

The best self-tanners for Asian skin tones are ones that can be applied without leaving an orange tint. These products should also have a natural and healthy looking color to them, like the way our skin looks after we spend time in the sun.

Asian Skin Tones

Asian Skin Tones are different from Caucasian skin tones. The difference is that Asian individuals have a larger amount of melanin in their skin, making them more susceptible to sunburns and suntans than those with lighter complexions.

People with these types of skin are better off applying self-tanners instead of spending time baking themselves under the summer sun.

Best Self-Tanners for Asian Skin Tones

The best self-tanners for Asian skin tones are ones that can be applied without leaving an orange tint. These products should also have a natural and healthy looking color to them, like the way our skin looks after we spend time in the sun.

1. Tanceuticals Self Tanner

This product by Tanceuticals is one of the best on the market for Asian skin tones because it does not leave an orange tint behind on your skin after application, and has a natural looking color to it that looks like you have been in the sun all day.

2. Hempz Touch of Summer Daily Moisturizer

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This lotion by Hempz is another great option for individuals with Asian skin tones because it does not leave behind an orange tint, and has a natural color to it that looks like you have spent time in the sun.

3. Maui Babe Self Tanner

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07/02/2022 11:14 am GMT

This self-tanner by Maui Babe is one of the best on the market for Asian skin tones because it does not leave an orange tint behind on your skin after application, and has a natural looking color to it that looks like you have been in the sun all day.

4. Beauty by Earth Self Tanner

This self-tanner by Beauty By Earth is another great option for individuals with Asian skin tones because it does not leave behind an orange tint, and has a natural color to it that looks like you have spent time in the sun.

5. Skinerals Self Tanner Sunless Bronzer Californium

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07/02/2022 10:43 am GMT

This self-tanner by Skinerals is one of the best on the market for Asian skin tones because it does not leave an orange tint behind, and has a natural color to it that looks like you have spent time in the sun.

6. Bahama Tan Self Tanning Lotion

This product by Bahama Tan is another great option for individuals with Asian skin tones because it does not leave behind an orange tint, and has a natural color to it that looks like you have spent time in the sun.

7. Hempz Touch of Summer Daily Moisturizer

We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

This product by Hempz is one of the best on the market for Asian skin tones because it does not leave an orange tint behind, and has a natural color to it that looks like you have spent time in the sun.

Why Asian Skin Tones so different?

Asian skin tones are typically lighter than European and African skin tones, even in darker complected individuals. This is due to the much greater numbers of fair-skinned individuals who hail from Asia when compared with other regions.

Asian women generally do not tan or darken much in the sun, making self tanner application a must for this group (although men are also included in this, as well).

Best Self-Tanners for Asian Skin Tones | Benefits & Drawbacks

So is it safe for Asians to use any self-tanners?

In short, the answer is “no”. Asian skin tones are much more sensitive to various ingredients contained in self-tanners, and as a result any products containing high concentrations of DHA (dihydroxyacetone) may cause your skin to darken much faster than you had expected.

How to properly apply self-tanners to your skin?

  • Start by exfoliating the affected areas with a scrub to remove dead skin cells and allow for better penetration of self-tanner.
  • Next, apply moisturizer or lotion all over the body before applying self-tanner onto any dry spots (elbows, knees, hands).
  • Finally, you can either spray or paint self-tanner onto your skin. For maximum results, apply in light layers.

How often can I use self-tanners?

While you may be tempted to re-apply a product after just one day of having applied it before, this is not recommended as the bronzing effect will only last two days at most on Asian skin tones.

The best advice is to use self-tanner every three days or so, allowing your skin cells time to slough off and create a fresh layer of outermost skin for maximum results.

Benefits of using self-tanners

  • Self-tanning can help to create a more even and uniform color all over your body.
  • Another benefit is that you will no longer need to be exposed to the sun (which is not recommended anyway) in order for your skin tone to darken, as most products contain tanning agents that will help you appear more tanned.
  • Self-tanners are also relatively inexpensive when compared to the cost of a professional airbrush tan session, and may contain moisturizing agents that can be beneficial for your skin.
  • Self-tanner can also be used to make your skin appear more even in color, which is beneficial for individuals who have darker patches of pigmentation or freckles.

Drawbacks of using self-tanners on Asian skin tones

  • One of the most common drawbacks is that self-tanners can cause your hands to turn an orange color as they typically contain DHA (dihydroxyacetone).
  • Most products will recommend exfoliating thoroughly before applying a product to avoid this from happening, but it is still something to be aware of.
  • Another drawback is that if you apply too much product or use an excessive amount of layers, you may actually darken your skin too much and become very noticeable.

Why do Asians use self-tanners?

Asians use self-tanners because they can make skin appear more even in color, and help to give your skin a healthy glow.

Self-tanning also allows you to get an “instant” tan without having to be exposed to the sun for prolonged periods of time (which is not recommended anyway).

Self-tanner is also much cheaper than an airbrush tanning session every so often, and can be easily applied at home.

Ingredients of self-tanners

Key ingredients to consider in self-tanner products for this demographic are dihydroxyacetone (DHA), botanical extracts, moisturizers, and vitamins.

  • Dihydroxyacetone is a colorless ingredient that reacts with dead cells on the surface of the skin’s epidermis to cause darkening, or “tanning”. DHA produces a natural-looking tan color that lasts about seven to ten days on average.
  • Botanical extracts are included in some brands as an alternative to DHA. This is because botanical extracts are less likely to cause skin irritation than traditional self tanners, which can aggravate sensitive skin types. Examples of botanical extracts include grapefruit seed extract, green tea, ginseng, and cucumber. These ingredients are commonly found in moisturizers to increase their effectiveness against the sun. This is another ingredient that reacts with dead cells on the surface of the skin’s epidermis to create a natural-looking tan color.
  • Vitamin E is a great antioxidant that helps remove the free radicals from your skin, which can cause premature aging and acne scars.

Skin Problems when using self-tanners

When using self-tanners for any skin type, it is always best to test a small patch of your skin first to see how you will react. The most common side effect from self-tanners is an allergic reaction. If you have sensitive or dry skin, then this may be more likely to happen than if you had oily or normal skin.

The most common sign of an allergic reaction is redness in areas where the product was used. If this occurs, wash it off immediately with soap and warm water; then apply a moisturizer to ease the irritation.

Less common side effects include itching or burning at the site, darkening of your skin in general (unintentional tanning), and hyper-pigmentation. If you experience any of the latter, never fear; it will fade over time if left alone. If you wish to fade it yourself, then use a high-quality sunscreen and avoid direct sunlight as much as possible.

What is a yellowish tint?

A yellowish tint is an indication that you have used too much self-tanner at one time, or layered it on over a period of several days. If your skin begins to look more tan than usual even after washing off the product, this will fade with some scrubbing and moisturizing.

There are many brands out there, and they all have their own unique qualities. It is best to experiment with a few different brands before deciding on what you like the most, as not everyone has the same skin type or preferences when it comes to self-tanning products.

FAQs:

Q: Is it safe to use self-tanner for sensitive skin?

A: Yes, but you should always remember to test a small portion of your skin first. If there are no adverse reactions after 24 hours then you can continue applying the product in an outwards motion on your face and body. Avoid rubbing or scrubbing very hard when exfoliating, as this can irritate your skin.

Q: Is it safe to use self-tanner if you are pregnant?

A: No, most products contain ingredients that are not recommended during pregnancy or breastfeeding. You should always check the label before using a product with DHA. This is because DHA has been known to induce premature birth in pregnant women.

Q: Is it safe to use self-tanner if you have acne?

A: Dihydroxyacetone is a known skin irritant, which can cause acne breakouts. If you already have active acne then we don’t recommend that you use products with this ingredient in them until your breakouts are under control.

Q: Is it safe to use self-tanner if you have rosacea?

A: Not unless it’s a hypoallergenic product that has been specifically formulated for sensitive skin types. If your facial redness and dry patches are not under control, then we don’t recommend using DHA on the affected areas as this can aggravate it.

Conclusion

The best self-tanners for Asian skin tones are ones that contain moisturizers, botanical extracts, vitamins and antioxidants; without DHA. This is because these ingredients are less likely to cause irritation or allergic reactions than traditional self tanners, which can aggravate sensitive skin types.

There are several self-tanners now available for Asian skin tones that have a maroon or dark orange tint to them to counteract the yellowish tint that exists in most self-tanners up until recently.

Best Self-Tanners for Asian Skin Tones | Benefits & Drawbacks